Mindfulness Coaching School
 

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Join our mindfulness coaching certification program and help others permanently reduce stress, overcome attention challenges, unpack their grief and move into acceptance. Also support your clients to improve their relationships, heal from past trauma, and find freedom from guilt and shame. The following Coach Objectives are important because they raise resilience in three areas. You will be trained to use an inventory tool and a thorough assessment to determine which areas of resilience your clients need support improving. The three areas of resilience are:

 

  • Comfort with what is (mind)

  • Comfort with change in status quo (gut)

  • Comfort with uncertainty (heart)

 

The following are ways low resilience manifests in your clients’ lives:

 

Lowest resilience in "comfort with what is" indicates the majority of your client’s stress is caused by unhealthy thought cycles, such as, worry, overthinking and rumination.

 

Lowest resilience in "comfort with change in status quo" indicates the majority of your client’s stress is caused by their inability to soothe their sympathetic nervous system, which causes physical and emotional instability.

 

Lowest resilience in "comfort with uncertainty" indicates the majority of your client’s stress is caused by their unhealed trauma.

 

As a Mindfulness Coach certification candidate, you will learn how to use over 60 tools and exercises that address these coaching objectives from our mindfulness coaching school. After 5 months of mindfulness coach training you will begin your clinical practice, which includes coaching six clients during three sessions each.

The TSD Mindfulness Client Assessments were administered before the first session. Results showed high levels of the following: stress, self-doubt, distraction and confusion in the “Mental Processing” category; uneasiness in the “Flight, Fight, Freeze” category; and feelings of neglect, rejection, inferiority, numbness, grief, loneliness and guilt in the “Grief and Trauma” category. High levels ranged from 40 to 80 on a 100 point scale.

 

Mindfulness Coach, Sarah Vallely, met with the client during four one-hour sessions. Vallely taught her the concept of rumination and to be mindful of what triggers her rumination. Vallely also explained the concept of devaluing, which happens whenever someone thinks they are lesser of a person due to an emotion, action or thought. The client learned that true self-compassion is wishing for yourself to not feel lesser than and learned self-compassion affirmations. Vallely encouraged the client to allow for physical responses to her emotions so that she could move into healing and acceptance.

 

Other concepts taught were “care for the person not the outcome” to help ease her anxiety and be relieved of holding on to a certain outcome with her daughter.  To support the client to be more open to possibility and let go of “definiteness”, Vallely taught her methods for trusting insights, accepting realities, and surrendering to authentic emotions of loss and pain. An additional concept taught was “humility”, such as associating her self-worth with humanness and accepting herself despite her mistakes.

 

Short mindfulness exercises Vallely taught the client included paying attention to breath, sounds in the environment, physical sensations (especially during a difficult emotion) and with eyes open looking at a physical object. Additionally, Vallely taught how to name thought cycles, such as rumination and redirect by shifting focus on breath or sounds; and shared a customized loving kindness meditation with the client.

 

Based on a follow up assessment after four sessions, the client decreased the following on a scale of 100 total points: “distraction” by 53 points, “confusion” by 36 points, “feelings of inferiority” by 31 points, “grief” by 46 points and “emotional numbness” by 40 points. Any decrease of 30 or more points, is considered a significant shift and the points for each state are based on nine questions. For example, nine questions regarding “distraction” were used to create a score for distraction.

The client reported feeling more acceptance with her grief and emotions, more focused, and more at peace after the four sessions. She described the following abilities to be some of the turning points for her.

 

The ability to:

  • Observe her difficult emotions, such as anger, rejection and disappointment, in a more detached way.

  • Be more aware of sounds and sights in nature and to have gratitude for this experience.

  • Notice rumination when it comes up and redirect attention.

  • Experience physical responses to emotions, such as crying, and notice physical sensations related to these emotions.

  • Be mindful of self-devaluing and replace with self-compassion.

  • Calm herself by looking at an object and/or breathing when difficult emotions feel intrusive.

  • Gain a state of calm by looking at an object during times of difficult emotions regarding spouse.

  • Use deep breathing to calm emotions of worry about her daughter.

 

The client reported that her relationship with her children has become stronger because of her new practice in focusing more on “caring for the person” as opposed to the “outcome” and pausing before responding. She explained that the mindfulness coaching makes her feel more empowered and calm; and has helped her heal a significant amount of grief around the loss of her husband. She was happy to tell me that after two years of no contact with her daughter, she said to her daughter, “Your difficulties do not define you nor make you any lesser of a person,” which exemplified a newfound compassion for her daughter that is helping support their new relationship.

Mindfulness Coaching in Real Life: Read Case Studies

As a Certification Candidate, you will be trained to deepen your mindfulness practice and instructed on how to use tools & exercises to support your clients.

Mindfulness Coaching Case Study #1

 

Client is female, 70 years-old, retired, and participated in four coaching sessions. When she began TSD mindfulness coaching with Sarah Vallely, she had just reached the two-year anniversary of her husband’s death and felt excluded by her extended family. She was also grieving the loss of her former community and intellectual interactions. She has four adult children. Her daughter suffers from substance abuse and the client had been out of contact with her or two years. The client recently found out her daughter was in jail and felt unappreciated by some of her other children.

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Mindfulness Coaching Case Study #2

 

Client is male, 67 years old, retired, and participated in ten coaching sessions.  The client experienced a difficult breakup with a girlfriend that left him feeling extreme levels of grief and loneliness. The client’s overactive analytical mind led him to spend much time in rumination and self-devaluing.  The client was mentally drained, emotionally raw and was experiencing fight/flight/freeze responses on a daily basis.  At times his anxiety levels reached the status of crisis.

 

The TSD Mindfulness Client Assessments were administered before the first session. Results showed high levels of the following: stress, self-doubt, distraction, shame, feeling provoked and confusion in the “Mental Processing” category; uneasiness, at risk, anxiety, concern, overwhelm, and exposed in the “Flight, Fight, Freeze” category; and feelings of neglect, rejection, inferiority, helplessness, disappointed, numbness, grief, loneliness and guilt in the “Grief and Trauma” category. High levels ranged from 50 to 100 on a 100-point scale.

Man with Beard

Mindfulness Concepts Taught

Mindfulness Coach, Sarah Vallely, met with the client during ten one-hour sessions. Vallely taught the stages of grief and how mental processing can drag out and intensify these stages. Vallely showed the client how to identify uncomfortable mental emotions and states such as anger and self-doubt; and how to identify heart-centered emotions such as loss, rejection and sadness. Vallely also broke down the aspects of a rumination cycle and the elements of a shame cycle so the client could better identify these episodes. She also explained how threats to emotional, physical and egotistical survival trigger a fight/flight/freeze response.

 

Exercises Used – Vallely taught exercises in self-compassion. She also explained how to label thought cycles in the moment, such as rumination, to limit these episodes. Vallely also taught exercises in embracing uncertainty to support the client to move into acceptance and detach from outcome. Additionally an exercises in stating, “Right now its like” to support acceptance and how to use single-pointed-focus on a physical stimulus, such as sound, physical sensations, or breath, to soothe emotions.

 

What Improved

Based on a follow up assessment after the tenth sessions, the client decreased the following on a scale of 100 total points: “feelings of shame” by 36 points, “feeling of being at risk” by 31 points, “uneasiness” by 33 points, “overwhelm” by 44 points, “disappointment” by 47, “guilt” by 38 and “helplessness” by 49 points. Any decrease of 30 or more points, is considered a significant shift and the points for each state are based on nine questions. For example, nine questions regarding “distraction” were used to create a score for distraction.

 

The client reported feeling more calm, clear and self-confident after his ten sessions. He reported four areas of mindfulness that allowed him to move through his grief process: mindfulness of his thinking, identifying and leaning into his emotions, exercises in soothing his nervous system, and self-compassion practice.

 

Mindfulness of Thinking

The client reported his practice in labeling his rumination episodes “rumination”, significantly reduced the amount of time he spent ruminating.  He also sometimes stated, “I know you are there, that’s fine, go about your business, and I’m going to go about my business.”

 

He also realized his grief emotions were causing self-devaluing thoughts, which led to feelings of shame. For example, emotions of hurt and rejection were causing him to devalue himself. For example, “I am too irresponsible,” and “I’ve always been a klutz.” He was also able to identify fantasy thoughts and name his thinking “fantasy”, which reduced the amount of time he spent with these thoughts and supported him to move into acceptance.  

 

Identification and Leaning into Emotions

The client reported because of mindfulness coaching he came to accept and understand his emotions were normal, especially considering the trauma he experienced. He also said stating, “Right now it’s like this,” when he experienced emotions, helped him better accept his circumstances. This acceptance freed him from using mental processes to evaluate his emotions and devalue himself for having them. He came to understand, “Regardless of how long it takes or the outcome, I will make it through, as I have in the past.”

 

The client reported when he allowed himself to lean into his emotions of sadness and loneliness and cry, he experienced a sense of relief. He also began to rephrase his thinking, “I am experiencing loneliness” instead of “I am lonely” which helped him experience his emotions as more temporary. He also used redirection by listening to nature sounds outside to help soothe his emotions.

 

 

Self-compassion Practice

The client reported self-compassion statements also helped him to accept his emotions. And self-compassion during episodes of rumination almost completely stopped his rumination. He used statements such as, "Even though I did this, I am loved, I am worthy of love, I am connected and I am a good person." And “I shall love myself even though I feel loneliness, rejection, and unloved by someone I wish would love me.”  And “If it is not yet time for me to be rid of my discomfort, I shall love myself with it.” Moreover, his self-compassion practice helped him realize his pattern of self-devaluing and the negative impact it had on his experience. He also realized “in the big picture” he is not actually alone nor rejected.

 

Soothing Nervous System

The client reported mindfulness coaching helped him see his sympathetic nervous system was triggered because he felt he could not mentally and emotionally survive his grief. The client’s nervous system was primarily activated due his feelings of being mentally trapped in thoughts about regret and loss. The client reported the exercise that soothed his nervous system most effectively was thinking about the people in his life he had healthy and strong relationships with and feeling gratitude for them. He also had good results soothing his sympathetic nervous system using a practice in focusing on sounds in his environment to soothe himself.

Frequently Asked Questions for Mindfulness Coach Certification
 

Is this course online or in person?

All of our programs are offered online.

 

How long is the course?

Six months

How will I participate in online classes and how long are the classes?

Online classes meet twice per month for three months (six classes total). We use Google Meet. When logged in, you will be able to view your instructor and classmates. You will also be able to ask questions by speaking or type questions and comments in the chat. Classes are 90 minutes long.

 

What do I do if I miss an online class?

All online classes are recorded, so you can view the class recording on our training platform for up to two months. You do not need to attend classes live to become certified, but you do need to attend the one-day retreat live (as works with your time zone).

 

How much homework will I be responsible for?

You will be responsible for one hour per week of reading and writing to fill certification requirements. And you will need to practice mindfulness meditation as described by your instructor for a minimum of 90 minutes per week for the first three months of the course; and increase your practice to a minimum of 120 minutes for the remaining months of the course. As a certification candidate you will also perform your student teaching or clinical practice. This will involve prepping for lessons and sessions, conducting mindfulness sessions, and documenting your experience during these sessions.

 

If you are not enrolled in a certification program, all homework is optional.

 

How much does the mindfulness coaching certification cost?

If you are a certification candidate, your monthly investment in yourself is $199 USD per month. Monthly payments can be cancelled at any time, however, any payments made before cancellation will not be refunded. Cost is different If you are not enrolled in a certification program.

Monthly course investment includes:

 

  • Participation in six 90-minute online classes.

  • Continued digital instruction via discussion forums between classes.

  • Unlimited access to recorded classes.

  • A 1-day online retreats.

  • One certification if all requirements are filled. Additional certifications are $300 each.

  • Unlimited access to coaching curriculum, normally sold for $89.00.

 

Monthly coaching investment includes:

 

  • 12 one-hour Mindfulness Coaching sessions with Sarah Vallely.

  • Additional training in curriculum not shared in classroom instruction.

  • Personalized & focused guidance for your sitting mindfulness practice and daily mindfulness mindset.

  • Deeper skills and experience to strengthen your work with students and clients.

 

How do I get certified?

Counselors, coaches & healers will meet with six clients, three sessions each. Teachers will teach six classes to a small group. Ministers will teach two classes, hold two counseling sessions, and give two sermons. All certification candidates will need to complete course training, private coaching for their specific program and participate in a 1-day retreat virtually and complete all the necessary paperwork, including prep materials, session notes, and practice reflections.

Can I cancel my program or move to another cohort?

Yes, you can cancel your monthly auto-payment at any time. However, any payments made before cancellation will not be refunded. Any monthly payments you have made can be transferred to another cohort, therefore you will not pay more if it becomes necessary for you to switch cohorts.

 
Course Syllabus

This is a combined syllabus for all programs, since many students work towards two certifications.

Classes 1 – 7

  • Mindfulness of thoughts

  • Mindfulness of emotions

  • Mindfulness of distraction

  • Improving resilience with mindfulness

  • Introduction to the mental, gut and heart centers.

  • Tips for teaching students with attention challenges

 

  • At home practice: minimum of 90 minutes of practice per week.

  • Homework: two reflections per month (written or video) and postings to digital forum.

  • Reading: chapters 1 – 14 in Tame Soothe Dwell by Sarah Vallely

Classes 8 – 15

 

  • Mindfulness techniques to tame your mind

  • Mindfulness techniques to soothe your gut

  • Mindfulness techniques to settle attention within your heart

  • Mindfulness techniques for breaking cycles of distorted emotions (ie. shame, resentment)

  • Mindfulness techniques for improving relationships, including relationships with addictive substances

  • Counseling, coaching and teaching instruction

 

  • At home practice: minimum of 90 minutes of practice per week.

  • Homework: two reflections per month (written or video) and postings to digital forum.

  • Reading: chapters 15 - 26 in Tame Soothe Dwell by Sarah Vallely

  • Clinical practice for counselors and coaches; prepare for student teaching for teachers.

 

Classes 15 – 20

 

  • Mindfulness techniques for integrating conscious with divine

  • Mindfulness techniques for healing

  • Mindfulness techniques for deeper emotional awareness

  • Mindfulness techniques for deeper spiritual awareness

 

  • At home practice: minimum 120 minutes per week.

  • Homework: two reflections per month (written or video) and postings to digital forum.

  • Reading: chapters 27 - 55 in Tame Soothe Dwell by Sarah Vallely

  • Healer and minister instruction.

  • Student teaching and healer and minister clinical practice.